Crimson Cup, Propeller Named Roasters of the Year

Crimson Cup Coffee & Tea and Propeller Coffee Co. were awarded Roaster of the Year honors by Roast magazine, an industry publication for coffee roasters.

According to Roast, Roaster of the Year awards “recognize companies that roast coffees of superior quality, exemplify a dedication to sustainability, promote employee and community education, and demonstrate a strong commitment to the coffee industry, among other criteria. The magazine awards top honors in two categories: Micro Roaster of the Year, for companies roasting fewer than 100,000 pounds of coffee each year; and Macro Roaster of the Year, for companies roasting more than 100,000 pounds annually.”

Crimson Cup was named Macro Roaster of the Year. The roaster, based in Columbus, Ohio, was recognized for its focus on education, work cultivating relationships with coffee growers around the world, its substantial commitment to supporting local charities, and the development of a number of innovative cold-brew products.

Propeller Coffee, based in Toronto, Canada, was name Micro Roaster of the Year. Propeller was recognized for its “commitment to sustainability — from the company’s energy-efficient downtown roastery and complete reliance on renewable energy to its innovative transportation solutions and high-efficiency natural-gas-powered roaster.”

See Crimson Cup reviews

See Propeller Coffee reviews

The post Crimson Cup, Propeller Named Roasters of the Year appeared first on Coffee Review.

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Crimson Cup, Propeller Named Roaster of Year

Crimson Cup Coffee & Tea and Propeller Coffee Co. were awarded Roaster of the Year honors by Roast magazine, an industry publication for coffee roasters.

According to Roast, Roaster of the Year awards “recognize companies that roast coffees of superior quality, exemplify a dedication to sustainability, promote employee and community education, and demonstrate a strong commitment to the coffee industry, among other criteria. The magazine awards top honors in two categories: Micro Roaster of the Year, for companies roasting fewer than 100,000 pounds of coffee each year; and Macro Roaster of the Year, for companies roasting more than 100,000 pounds annually.”

Crimson Cup was named Macro Roaster of the Year. The roaster, based in Columbus, Ohio, was recognized for its focus on education, work cultivating relationships with coffee growers around the world, its substantial commitment to supporting local charities, and the development of a number of innovative cold-brew products.

Propeller Coffee, based in Toronto, Canada, was name Micro Roaster of the Year. Propeller was recognized for its “commitment to sustainability — from the company’s energy-efficient downtown roastery and complete reliance on renewable energy to its innovative transportation solutions and high-efficiency natural-gas-powered roaster.”

See Crimson Cup reviews

See Propeller Coffee reviews

The post Crimson Cup, Propeller Named Roaster of Year appeared first on Coffee Review.

11 Crazy Coffee Drinks You Won’t Find on a Starbucks Menu

I don’t know about you but sometimes I feel myself getting into a coffee rut. I mean, you can only order so many half-caff, low-fat, no whipped cream macchiatos before you start to feel like you are missing out on things the greatest drink in the world can offer.

Well, no more.

It turns out that cultures around the world have developed an abundance of alternative ways to make (and drink) coffee, including everything from lemon juice to eggs to alcohol.

So set your french press and v60 aside for a minute and learn about these crazy coffee drinks.

#1 Turkish Coffee

turkish-coffee

Turkish Coffee by Quinn Dombrowski

You have probably heard of, if not tried, this one.

Turkish coffee is consumed all over the world but it is the drink of choice in many parts of (you guessed it) Turkey, the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

It is a drink steeped in history, going back well over 400 years with the recipe changed very little.

The preparation is relatively simple. You take water and sugar (recipe in link below) and boil them together before adding a very fine mix of coffee and cardamom powder and reboiling. After boiling, let it sit briefly to foam before pouring it, grounds and all, into a small cup (think Italian espresso cup).

You then sip slowly and enjoy. The slowly part is key here because if you do not, you learn the hard way what mouth full of coffee and cardamom powder tastes like.

Recipe: Preparing a Traditional Turkish Coffee (I Need Coffee)

#2 Vietnamese Iced Coffee

Vietnamese Coffee Brewer

From How to Brew Vietnamese Coffee

Next, we head over to Asia where hot drinks have been commonplace for eons.

Vietnamese coffee has gained popularity over recent years, so you have probably heard of it. It is immensely popular on the streets of Vietnam and variations of it appear all over Southeast Asia.

It is essentially a two-layer ice coffee with sweetened condensed milk as the base with black coffee in the middle and a foam on top. It is traditionally served over ice and made using robusta beans (not my favorite) but using arabica and drinking it hot is just as enjoyable.

Recipe: How to Brew Vietnamese Iced Coffee (I Need Coffee)

#3 Oliang (Thai Coffee)

thai-iced-coffee

Thai Iced Coffee by Chris Goldberg

Now just a hop, skip and a jump over to Thailand where we find Oliang, or Thai iced-corn-soya bean-sesame coffee.

Oliang is made by taking your coffee and additional ingredients blend (see recipe below), putting it into a coffee sock, pouring boiling water through it and letting it steep for ~10-15 minutes before adding sugar and pouring over ice. You then add sweetened condensed milk (how they do it on the streets of Bangkok), pop in a straw and enjoy!

If for some reason you are opposed to the sock method, you can simply steep the coffee blend in hot water for the same time and then filter it (it won’t be traditional though).

Recipe: Thai Iced Coffee Recipe (Oliang) (Temple of Thai)

#4 Yuan Yang (Coffee with Tea)

coffee-tea-pour

Photo by Petra Bensted

Coffee? Tea? Why not some of both? Yuan yang is a favorite drink in Hong Kong; so much so that the Starbucks stores in Hong Kong actually had a limited time offering of it as a Frappacino.

Yuan Yang is made by making strong black tea in a pot, stirring in evaporated or sweetened condensed milk and coffee, then sweetening to taste. Add some shortbread cookies and you have yourself an Asian twist on high tea.. ahem, coffee.

Recipe: Hong Kong Yuan Yang Tea (Food.com)

#5 Mazagran (Portuguese Lemon Coffee)

lemon-coffee

Next we head over to Portugal where they have found other unique takes on coffee, specifically adding lemon to it. Now you may not think that coffee and lemon sounds intuitive, but this iced drink can actually be incredibly refreshing.

It is essentially a coffee lemonade made by taking strong coffee and mixing it with lemon juice and sugar to taste. You then pour it all over ice, kick back and enjoy your fresh take on lemonade.

Recipe: Portuguese Coffee Lemonade (Mazagran / Capile) (Cooking with Alia)

#6 Greek Frappé

greek-frappe

Greek Frappé by Tilemahos Efthimiadis

Staying in Europe, another refreshing take on the world’s greatest drink; the renowned frappé, especially loved throughout Greece.

To make, you add a small amount of cold water, instant coffee and sugar to a jar or shaker and shake vigorously for 10-20 seconds or until it is incredibly foamy.

You then pour the mixture over ice, add water and milk to taste and voila, you have created a frappé!

Recipe: Greek Frappe Recipe (I Need Coffee)

#7 Swedish Egg Coffee

eggs

Photo by Kevin Choi

Now up to Scandinavia where they have created a new take on coffee for breakfast. Popular in both Sweden and Norway, egg coffee is exactly what it sounds like.

To make it, you mix raw egg with coffee grounds and a small amount water and mix it until it has the consistency of, well, an egg-coffee slurry. You then take the slurry, pour it into a pot of boiling water, mix, strain and serve.

The result is supposedly one of the smoothest and creamiest cups of coffee you will ever have; make sure you use good eggs though.

Recipe: Swedish Egg Coffee (The Iron Buzz)

#8 Irish Coffee

irish-coffee

Irish Coffee by Chris Arnold

Alcohol and coffee, what else do you really need? Almost everyone has heard of, if not tried an Irish coffee, though most people simply use Baileys rather than making the real thing.

All you need for this bonafied beverage is your coffee of choice, Irish whiskey, brown sugar and some whipped heavy cream (or just whipped cream from a can if you’re lazy).

It makes an excellent after-dinner dessert drink, or, you know, something for breakfast.

Recipe: The Best Irish Coffee in the World (I Need Coffee)

#9 Pharisäer (German Rum Coffee)

german-pharisaer-coffee

Pharisäer by Agnes Chang

Continuing our alcoholic trend, Pharisäer, or rum coffee. It is a decadent drink that originated in Germany but can really be enjoyed anywhere in the world.

Similar to the Irish method, you simply take your favorite strong cup of coffee, add sugar and then add in a shot (or more) of rum before topping with whipped cream and a dusting of cocoa. Also, a good thing to remember is that you are not technically supposed to stir this drink once it is assembled, but rather sip it through the layer of whipped cream.

Recipe: Pharisees Coffee with Rum – Pharisaeer (About.com)

#10 Cafe de Olla (Mexican Coffee)

cafe-de-olla-coffee

Cafe de Olla by Chris Arnold

Nearing the end of our trip is cafe de olla or Mexican cinnamon coffee. While it does not contain alcohol, it is similar to Irish coffee or a pharisäer in that it is more of a dessert than drink, but there is no shame in that.

It is incredibly easy to make, you just take water, coarse coffee, brown sugar, and a cinnamon stick and boil it all together. You then take it off heat and let it infuse for about 10 minutes before straining and serving; you can optionally add whipped cream for extra richness.

The cinnamon pairs excellently with the coffee and adds another depth of flavour while the brown sugar adds decadence that plain white lacks.

Recipe: How To Make Mexican Coffee (Cafe de Olla) (MrBreakfast.com)

#11 Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony

ethiopia-coffee-ceremony

Ethiopian Coffee Ceremony by Matt Handy

Last on our crazy list is more of a ritual than a type of drink, but bears an honorable mention. Similar to a tea ceremony in Japan, the coffee ceremony takes into account everything from the type of cups and pot that are used to the atmosphere of the environment.

It is traditionally performed as a sign of friendship and welcoming and should never be turned down as it would be a great insult to the host.

To begin, the woman (traditionally it is a female that performs it) will burn incense to ward away evil spirits and will continue to burn it throughout the ceremony. She will then set a jebena, or clay coffee pot, filled with water and place it over heat before taking green coffee beans and cleaning them over hot coals.

After the heat removes the husk, the hostess will then proceed to roast the beans over the hot coals similar to how one might use the stove to make popcorn; she will typically roast the beans until they are medium to dark brown.

The freshly roasted beans are then ground in a mortar and pestle and added to the jebena where the entire mixture is brought to a boil before serving in handle-less cups.

The entire process can take several hours and each part should be treated with reverence and respect. If you ever get the chance to attend a ceremony be sure to take advantage of the opportunity!

Ritual: Coffee Cultures: Eritrea and Ethiopia (I Need Coffee)

Conclusion

So there you have it 11 unique and crazy ways to spice up coffee, not that it needs it.

Go out and impress your friends and never let your coffee be dull again!

The post 11 Crazy Coffee Drinks You Won’t Find on a Starbucks Menu appeared first on I Need Coffee.

Verve West 3rd: The Latest Coffee Bar From Verve Los Angeles

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Verve Coffee Roasters‘ latest cafe, on West 3rd in the Los Angeles neighborhood of Beverly Grove, quietly opened its doors this month with a mandate: to continue the education of thirsty Angelenos on quality coffee, Third Wave sourcing ethics, and how to run one cool business. It’s the latest addition to the growing cadre of Los Angeles cafes from our friends and partners at Verve, joining their spaces in Downtown Los Angeles and Melrose with a shared aesthetic but some pronounced differences. The new cafe features the company’s first “Farmlevel Bar”, a bright interior, ample seating, and that rarest and most precious of Los Angeles commodities: parking!

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Situated between Los Angeles shopping landmarks—the Beverly Center and the Grove Los Angeles—Verve’s location may engender perceptions of trendy tourists carrying designer bags. It’s not so! (at least so far), says Verve Coffee co-founder Colby Barr, who tells me the store’s early crew of regulars are predominantly local residents lured by the cafe’s proximity to Belcampo Meat Company (delicious) and sweetgreen (nutritious). “Most people coming in have never heard of us,” Barr says, which is something he clearly enjoys. “Our real, core self is just the neighborhood vibe.” This might be hard to fathom if your conception of LA’s West Side comes from tacky reality TV shows, but I assure you: this is a city of little neighborhoods, full of its own rhythms and regulars, like any other market in so many ways. Just one block behind the traffic of 3rd Street is a dense residential community supplying a flow of low-key patrons.

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

The defining feature here is what Verve calls a “Farmlevel Bar”. This is a new feature, and marks the concept’s first appearance at any of Verve’s cafes in California. Manned by Kristen Kovaletz, a ringer brought down the coast from Verve’s hometown of Santa Cruz, the Farmlevel Bar is detached from the front register; the idea being, to reduce the immediacy and pressure from regular bar interactions, enabling in-depth conversations to develop from whatever customers are most interested in. Kovaletz is prepared to edify adventurous inquisitors on the subtleties between black and red honey-processed coffee, how water at coffee farms impacts local villages, and how certain coffee producing co-ops have evolved over time. The space is an opportunity for “opt-in” education: think of it as as sort of delicious, beautiful coffee infodesk. Anyone is free to discuss coffee as much or as little as they choose, removed from the rush of the service line.

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Customers at the Farmlevel Bar will be able to purchase any of Verve’s coffee offerings by the ounce, hand scooped from the very same jars used at the opening of the 41st Avenue location in Santa Cruz. Barr hopes that people will feel comfortable buying a few ounces of each to get a feel for all the offerings. “So far no one has ordered just one ounce,” he says. (You could be the first!)

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Architectural partner Commune Design has created an interior with high ceilings, I-beam posts, and exposed rafter joists evoking the feeling of a farmhouse (no easy trick for a cafe in West LA). All the furniture, leather table tops, plywood walls, and brass counters are intended to wear with the shop like a favorite pair of raw denim, and the facade windows and multiple skylights allow natural light to reach almost every corner of the space. The centerpiece is the horseshoe bar, with a four-group Kees van der Westen Spirit espresso machine imported from Holland. Paired with the machine is a trio of Nuova Simonelli Mythos One grinders. At the Farmlevel Bar a trio of Modbar pour-over modules work with a Mahlkönig EK 43 grinder.

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Verve is preparing a new partnership in the coming weeks with Hiro Clark, in the form of a very limited run of 36 t-shirts featuring Verve images. Each shirt will be packed in its own Stanley thermos for your next trip to the beach. Bitter Root Pottery has created one-of-a-kind ceramics and pastries are stocked by Short Cake bakery; the lemon poppy seed cake is a must try.

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

I think the best way to think about this new shop is in its dualities. From the outside, Verve 3rd Street looks like a comfortable neighborhood place to enjoy a latte, and it is that. But for those looking deeper, the team at Verve 3rd Street are making education accessible to the consumer and are advancing discussions on “ethics and excellence” in coffee from behind their Farmlevel Bar. You can use the cafe as a passerby, a casual fling, or you can choose to look for something deeper—Verve is happy to facilitate both types of use. This style of direct to consumer education, in the form of a dedicated employee interaction space, has the potential to create some meaningful experiences for coffee newbies, curious regulars, or those seeking knowledge on their own coffee quest. Verve’s new cafe is a nexus for awareness, and everyone is welcome.

verve coffee roasters west 3rd street los angeles farmlevel bar sprudge

Verve Coffee Roasters is located at 8055 West 3rd Street, Los Angeles. Visit their official website and follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Mackenzie Champlin is a freelance journalist based in Los Angeles. Read more Mackenzie Champlin on Sprudge.

The post Verve West 3rd: The Latest Coffee Bar From Verve Los Angeles appeared first on Sprudge.

In New York, Till and Sprocket Interfaces With A Collaborative Lounge

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

Making an innovative, creative life thrive requires the right ingredients to fuel it—good coffee, good food, and the space to think and be inspired chief among them. An unusual collaborative business in what was once known as Manhattan’s Fur District is hoping to knock all three of these ingredients out of the park.

Till and Sprocket sits quietly in a storefront on West 30th Street, in the looming shadows of the giant, castle-like NYPD 23rd Precinct. Beyond the space’s tastefully gold-lettered entrance you’ll find window seats peppered with fashionable throw pillows, a long marble bar stretching towards the open kitchen and dining area, and behind that bar, not one, but two, three-group Synesso Cyncras, a Mahlkönig EK 43 grinder, and suspiciously good-looking Kraft-paper bags of locally roasted coffee. The restaurant—primarily a cafe in the mornings, with coffee service blurring into lunch and dinner as the hours wax later—is clearly operating beyond average NYC parameters.

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

Pass through the main space and into the atrium-bathed courtyard in back, though, and you’ll come upon not only a lovely private dining space but a mysterious set of double doors. These are the borderlands between Till and Sprocket and its sister business, Interface, a not-exactly-a-co-working-space that offers membership-based facilities for gathering and, the founders hope, collaborative inspiration.

“Loosely defined, it’s a membership lounge/community space,” Andrew Karp, the lounge’s director tells me. And indeed, it feels like that. No office carrels or rows of USB ports clutter this open landscape, which is instead anchored by a few communal tables and vaguely separated, but not fixedly so, seating clusters of comfy chairs and couches.

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

The meeting and collaboration space will, well, interface with the restaurant and cafe in a fluid way for members, says Karp. The building’s owner, Alex Bernstein—whose family, once furriers in this neighborhood, moved into realty—saw the two spaces as ways to find a new model for the changing neighborhood.

Interface is a passion project, says Karp, meant to provide resources and amenities to its community while fueling the new media creativity that has been drawn to the area. “The restaurant idea was originally the revenue driver—something the neighborhood has always needed beyond a grab-and-go coffee shop or a TV-strewn Irish sports bar,” explains Karp, adding, “In turn, hopefully, [Interface] culturally can support that.”

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

“Both brands are ideas to raise the water level of the entire neighborhood,” he continued. “The hope is that they begin working together, they begin collaborating, they begin solving each others problems, and this neighborhood will become more than just fur and jewelry wholesale, it will become what it was meant to be—this culturally vibrant technical and media-rich neighborhood.”

For Interface members, $100/month gets them access to the private space each day, along with coffee and pastries furnished by Till and Sprocket. Other food and drinks from the bar may be ordered into the space as well. Members will also have access to special events, from workshops and media presentations to the upcoming “Cranksgiving” charity bike race finish line party, in November. The space also offers Wi-Fi, which it should be noted the connected cafe does not.

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

But what if you’re just looking for a great cup of coffee or a bite to eat? Till and Sprocket’s coffee program is poised to deliver, from the double-fisted espresso machine lineup to Chemex, Phoenix, and AeroPress by-the-cup methods, and coffee brought in from as nearby as Brooklyn’s Sweetleaf and Lofted roasters to further-flung guests like Bay Area boutique roaster Linea Caffe. Coffee is available at all hours, and is accompanied in the mornings by treats like strawberry muffins and passion cream donuts, housemade by pastry chef Sydney Dempsey, formerly of Dominique Ansel Bakery (home of the Cronut®). Later in the day, full lunch and dinner menus accompany the coffee and bar offerings. Dinner, which launched only a couple of weeks ago, is the work of chef Bryan Arbeláez, formerly of Upland, and is firmly rooted in a lively New American sensibility of grains and greens.

till and sprocket interface coffee sprudge new york city

Though the coffee program has been up and running for a few months, finally getting all the moving parts together in the restaurant and Interface lounge has been a bit like a sitcom, says Karp.

“The chef, Bryan, found his phone in the freezer this morning… after two days.”

Here’s hoping for no more wrenches in the sprocket.

Till and Sproket is located at 140 West 30th Street, New York. Visit their official website and follow them on Facebook and Instagram.

Liz Clayton is the associate editor at Sprudge.com, based in Brooklyn. Read more Liz Clayton on Sprudge.

The post In New York, Till and Sprocket Interfaces With A Collaborative Lounge appeared first on Sprudge.

Coffee Variety Family Tree – from Cafe Imports

Coffee Variety Family Tree – from Cafe Imports is a post written by FRSHGRND. If you’re viewing this on a third party’s website, please hit the link above to go directly to the source for a better experience 🙂 FRSHGRND – Coffee Reviews, Travel, Photography – Cafe Reviews & Coffee News for Thirsty Nomads

Cafe Imports - Coffee Variety Family Tree

If you ever wanted to see how all the different coffee varieties are related, this coffee variety family tree by Cafe Imports is pretty great. Most specialty coffee roasters include information about the coffee variety on their labels, but it can be difficult to keep track or make sense of – next time, take a look at this and see if you start noticing patterns beyond just the origin locations you favor! They even have translated versions in Russian, Korean, and Mandarin Chinese. Click through to download an 11×17″ PDF.

Cultural Context and Coffee Tasting Notes

Cultural Context and Coffee Tasting Notes is a post written by FRSHGRND. If you’re viewing this on a third party’s website, please hit the link above to go directly to the source for a better experience 🙂 FRSHGRND – Coffee Reviews, Travel, Photography – Cafe Reviews & Coffee News for Thirsty Nomads

If you’re not already reading it, you should check out Peter Giuliano’s blog “Pax Coffea” on Tumblr. The former director of coffee for Counter Culture and current head of the SCAA’s Symposium has a unique angle on coffee, and a wealth of knowledge to share.

In a recent post he gets to the bottom of something my American readers have probably already noticed – the bewildering proliferation of the “blackcurrant” flavor descriptor. If you grew up in the US, you’re probably not familiar with that taste – and yet it’s used all the time on coffee bags to describe what flavor you should expect from Kenyan coffee.

Kenyan coffee is special for many reasons, but one thing in particular stands out. Coffee from Kenya- particularly coffee grown from the SL-28 cultivar- has a especially beautiful flavor almost never tasted in coffees from other countries. It’s a tangy, dark-fruit flavor, mouthwatering and compelling, memorable and unique. It’s a flavor that calls out for specific description, and that description is what this story is about. The story starts, however, with white pine.

Head over to the post to learn the surprising history behind this semiotic confusion!

Currants and Gooseberries - and the history of a coffee flavor descriptor